Exactly one year after President Donald Trump's inauguration, hundreds of thousands of women and men took to the streets across the continent on Saturday to send him another message.

Canada's capital was no exception, with up to 8,000 people marching to stand in solidarity with women and human rights groups against the Trump administration.

Women's March, 2018 edition in images. Thousands of people take to the streets in solidarity with their American counterparts.

The 'very stable genius' tweeted about the event himself, perhaps not fully understanding what it was all about, perhaps goading: “Beautiful weather all over our great country, a perfect day for all Women to March. Get out there now to celebrate the historic milestones and unprecedented economic success and wealth creation that has taken place over the last 12 months. Lowest female unemployment in 18 years!”

To the north, the Ottawa event was a family-friendly affair, with many children present, as well as dogs and a gallery of bright colours, much to this photojournalist's delight.

While waiting for speakers to do their thing at the Women's March 2018 gathering, young Hazel and Oliver Coates decided to play on the West Lawn of Parliament Hill, under their mother's supervision. The kids insisted this was no snowman, it was a snowwoman.

The crowds spent about 90 minutes on Parliament Hill, listening to speakers before stepping off for the march, walking westward on Wellington Street, turning south on Bank, then west again on Laurier, to reach Bronson street. They later made their way to the Bronson Centre to hear more speakers and performances.

The bells on Parliament's Peace tower belted out its daily longer noon set, drowning out some speakers as they usually do for every event scheduled at this time.

In the end, everything went off smoothly, the police reported no incident, despite a two man counter protest to make sure men's rights were not forgotten.

Where there's a protest, there usually is a counter-protest. This was it. These two men stood out at the corner of Laurier and Lyon streets, near the Bronson Centre with signs saying "There are ONLY two genders" and "Male Lives Matter". Photo by Caitlin Armstrong

Here is the Women's March 2018, in images:

Kids were everywhere at the 2018 Women's March in Ottawa, organized in solidarity with women and human rights groups, a year after Donald Trump's inauguration. One cannot agree more with little Penelope Dej's statement.

The creativity of signs are a staple of the Women's Marches, and this iteration is no exception. Chantal and Ema Phan were channeling some General Leia, who truly became a feminist icon, on this January 20th in Ottawa.

The RCMP's assault rifles are now a standard sight on Parliament Hill, even if the event is a peaceful family-oriented one, and the Women's March was no exception.

While listening in to speakers, Alexandra Nicholas was direct and to the point in a rather masterful wordplay in reaction to Trump's presidency.

Hastily made signs are a thing as well, and they're all about the message. Angela Plant, Sophie Stephenson, and friends were still pretty happy with their signs made over brunch at the Women's March 2018 in Ottawa.

Signage at these events tends to be on point. Sometimes, however, some might just be confused as to what's going on, not unlike Trump.

On January 20th, 2018, Catherine Butler is hosting the crowd at the 2018's iteration of the Women's March, organized in solidarity with women and human rights groups. The crowd gathered on Parliament Hill for speeches for 90 minutes before stepping off towards the Bronson Centre.

Amira Elghawaby, a journalist and human rights advocate, addresses the crowd on the steps of Parliament Hill, this January 20th, 2018, at this year's Women's March, organized in solidarity with women and human rights groups. The crowd gathered on Parliament Hill for speeches for 90 minutes before stepping off towards the Bronson Centre.

Tones of Trump resistance were still present at this year's Women's March, organized in solidarity with women and human rights groups.

Standing in power.

The Ogimaakwewak Singers and Drummers, indigenous female only drummers and singers, are leading the Women's March 2018 along Wellington street, after leaving Parliament Hill.

Marissa Mills is part of The Ogimaakwewak Drummers, indigenous female only drummers and singers, leading the Women's March 2018 along Wellington street, after leaving Parliament Hill.

This man was sitting against the fire hydrant and resting. It's unknown if he was hanging out to watch the march or just hanging out to catch some rays on a warmer than usual day in this Ottawa winter.

Between 6,000 to 8000 people marched on the street in Ottawa. They are seen here approaching Bronson Street on Laurier Street.

Catherine McKenna, Canada's Environment and Climate Change Minister was present at the march along with her daughter and spoke at the Bronson Centre. Being a constant target of misogyny in her position, the Women's March, also happening in her riding, takes special meaning.

Yes, you are. The march is headed south on Bronson Street in Ottawa, near the Bronson Centre.

Hermioning it. J.K. Rowling would probably agree.

Respect in the Streets, Consent in the Sheets.

It does not.

Star Wars themes were clear this year, and sported by some of the Alpha Pi Phi sorority, walking down Bronson Avenue.

Rock on, young ones, rock on.

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Comments

Just one aside...

"...The RCMP's assault rifles are now a standard sight on Parliament Hill, even if the event is a peaceful family-oriented one, and the Women's March was no exception..."

Either you have evidence from government policy or you are normalising something very non-Canadian. Which is it?

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